Although the full text hasn’t been finalized yet, I do have plans for how the Saint Aelfric Customary will recommend the implementation of most of the features in the 2019 Prayer Book.  In short, I can’t tell you why these suggestions are here yet, but if you want to order your prayers accordingly, here is the weekly guide!

Planning Prayers

Sunday 12/15

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: Te Deum laudamus and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Third Sunday of Advent (Year A)
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and Nunc dimittis

Monday 12/16

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: #1 Magna et mirabilia and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Third Sunday of Advent (with the traditional readings)
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and #4 Quaerite Dominum

Tuesday 12/17

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: #1 Magna et mirabilia and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Votive: of the Blessed Virgin Mary (The Visitation)
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and #4 Quaerite Dominum

Wednesday 12/18

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: #1 Magna et mirabilia and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Ember Day I
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and #4 Quaerite Dominum

Thursday 12/19

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: #1 Magna et mirabilia and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Votive*
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and #4 Quaerite Dominum

Friday 12/20

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: #1 Magna et mirabilia and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Ember Day II
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and Nunc dimittis, Collect for St. Thomas

Saturday 12/21

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: Te Deum and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: SAINT THOMAS
  • Evening Prayer: Magnificat and Nunc dimittis

Sunday 12/22

  • Morning Prayer Canticles: Te Deum laudamus and Benedictus
  • Holy Communion: Fourth Sunday of Advent (Year A)
  • Evening Prayer Canticles: Magnificat and Nunc dimittis

* A Votive is a “Various Occasion” (page 733 in the BCP 2019).  The traditional appointments are Holy Trinity on Sunday, Holy Spirit on Monday, Holy Angels on Tuesday, of the Incarnation on Wednesdays, of the Holy Eucharist on Thursdays, the Holy Cross on Fridays, and of the Blessed Virgin Mary on Saturdays.

Readings Review

Last week: Ecclus. (Sirach) 44-50, Revelation 1-6, Isaiah 51-57, Luke 12-16
This week: Wisdom 1-5, Revelation 7-13, Isaiah 58-64, Luke 17-20:26

Special reading for St. Thomas’ Day on Saturday morning: John 14:1-7

With Sirach finished yesterday we begin now on the book The Wisdom of Solomon.  Like Ecclesiastes and much of the book of Proverbs, this book’s authorship is attributed to King Solomon, and written in his voice.  But, also like those books, the ascription to Solomon here is primarily honorific.  They are all written in the tradition of Solomon; we have little way of knowing how much of any of this truly came from his own pen (or stylus?).  And ultimately that’s not the point; the point is that these various wisdom writings are in the great wisdom tradition that Solomon began, or popularized, or codified, or brought into the mainstream.

The opening three chapters of Wisdom, particularly, are arguably its best-known parts.  Their descriptions of the righteous and the unrighteous, and the interaction between the two, find themselves powerful readings when read with a christo-centric eye: the way the unrighteous resolve to “test” the righteous sounds very much like the pharisees’ account of the crucifixion of Jesus.  And chapter 3’s dealing with the security of the godly soul in the hands of God, even in death, makes for excellent reading, not only for comfort in time of grieving, but also clear indication of pre-Christian belief in the afterlife (which scholars sometimes like to quibble about when dealing with the Old Testament).

The Servant Songs of Isaiah have finished, though some powerful chapters are still hitting us this week.  Chapters 58 & 59 deal with fasting, prayer, and alms-giving, earning them prominent places in a few lectionaries on Ash Wednesday.  Chapters 60 & 61 deal with Gentiles and the heavenly Jerusalem, earning them prominent places in Epiphany and Advent alike.

In Luke, the “Kingdom of God” teachings are beginning to increase now.  They’re not quite as thick and heavy as Matthew’s Gospel presents them at this stage of the game, but they’re still quite prominent themes, and at the end of the week we’ll make it to the Triumphal Entry.  As noted a week or two ago, keep the Cross in mind as you read these chapters.

One thought on “Planning Prayers & Readings Review

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